Is It Too Late?

Is It Too Late?

Is it too late to start exercising? Fitness professionals are asked this all the time, and here is the answer. No!!! Whether you haven’t exercised in a long time, haven’t ever exercised, are in your early 30s or your late 90s, it is never too late to start exercising...

Exercising, no matter when you start, can dramatically improve your health. You will have greater stamina, increased strength and endurance, improved balance and flexibility, a clearer brain, better heart health, lowered diabetes risk, and much, much more!

A Healthy World = A Healthy You

A Healthy World = A Healthy You

In honor of Earth Day last month, I want to talk about taking care of ourselves by taking care of the world we live in. This has been on my mind as I’ve been playing at the park with my daughter. Being an inquisitive toddler, she finds every bit of trash on the ground and brings it over to show me. I have been astonished by the trash laying around a children’s park! This astonishment increased when we went backpacking as a family, found a campsite in the middle of the woods, and found empty plastic water bottles, cigarette butts, and other trash hidden behind a fallen tree. If there’s any where you expect to find cleanliness, it’s while you’re camping, far away from humanity.

Are You Ready for Real Change?

Are You Ready for Real Change?

Yes!! I’m ready for real change. (Body straightens up, shoulders back and down, chin up).  Let’s do this…tomorrow. (Body slumps down).

Why is it so difficult to make sustainable change?

Did you know our bodies are hard wired to resist change? It takes energy to break out of the patterns that have become so easy, our habits if you will. Habits are life on auto pilot.

Do you remember when you first learned how to drive a car? How many things did you have to think about? Checking speed, checking mirrors, shifting (well, some of us learned on a manual), feet on the pedals, which one brakes, which moves us forward…it’s a lot to think about. After you’ve been driving for a few years, how much time does it take to think about it? Not much because you instinctively now know what to do. The bottom part of your brain has taken over and it’s habitual now.

So, forming habits is all about learning. Not learning like knowing the right thing to do. Most of us know the right things to do. Eat lots of fruits and vegetables, eat lean meats and whole grains. Easy, right? Well, if it were easy we’d all be doing it. What has made it so tough?

Advertising for one – they make foods that are bad for you look so tempting. Sugar for another – it’s more addictive than cocaine and it’s hidden in so much of our food. Processed foods – they are so quick and convenient. There are many culprits out there that have misguided our habits and way of eating.

So, what’s a girl (or guy for that matter) to do??

  1. Let’s start by believing. You can achieve what you believe. If you don’t believe you can do it, it will never happen. Surround yourself with others who believe in you. The more they positively influence you, the more you’ll believe in yourself. Stop the negative self-talk and be as kind to yourself as you would be to your best friend.
     
  2. Next, we focus on small changes. Many of us have heard it takes 21 days to create a habit. Well, maybe. Some habits take 21 days, some will take less time and some will take more time. The bigger the change, the longer it will take to make it part of your everyday life. Start with something small and build on that, like the snowball effect. If you need more water, start by drinking a glass of water first thing in the morning. Do it every day until it becomes a habit. Need more vegetables, start with one a day, build from there.
     
  3. Reward yourself for the successes, however small they may seem. Even just an “atta girl!” is a boost in your confidence. The larger the achievement the larger the reward.

Understand there will be set-backs. It’s part of life. Don’t sweat it! Accept that it will happen, but plan for it, so when it does, you don’t fall back into the same bad behaviors. Get up, dust yourself off and keep moving forward.

Books have been written on this, so I could go on for a very long time. But if you will start here you’ll be off to a good start. If you need help, contact us at HomeFit. We can help you get on a path to a happier healthier you!

Using Exercise to Battle Instability

Using Exercise to Battle Instability

Can I improve my balance with exercise? This is a question asked by people in many circumstances. I was once asked this question by a woman who was recovering from a stroke. She was young, had experienced multiple strokes, and didn’t have good balance. She wanted to improve her physical fitness, but she was worried about her ability to do so. Whether you too are a stroke victim, have osteoporosis, are an older adult, have MS, are pregnant, or just feel unsteady on your feet, know that exercise can help improve your balance!

Seasonal Eating

Seasonal Eating

While gardening isn’t for everyone, eating fresh fruits and vegetables definitely is! Every plant has a season, and every season has certain plants that grow best during those months. Grocery stores sell quite a few foods all year long as they have access to foods from all over the world, and this is great! I love being able to buy all kinds of foods throughout the year. But there are definitely benefits to buying more seasonal foods.

Head Outside!

Head Outside!

Think about it – going outside makes you more likely to be physically active, even if it’s just light physical activity like strolling around your yard or standing and watching your kids play a game. Spending time in your yard means you might notice some weeds that need to be pulled and kneel down to pull them out, or you might see your dog and realize it could use a walk. If you don’t have a yard, you might head to the park and walk around a walking trail or play Frisbee with some friends. Heading outside on your lunch break could lead you on a quick walk around the block or on a jaunt to the park for a picnic.

 

Think of ways you can increase your time outside. Try getting out for a walk before or after work. Head out with some coworkers during lunch, or even just step outside for a quick 10 minute break during the day. Instead of sitting down on the couch to relax when you get home from work, head outside to take a breath of fresh air or take a relaxing bike ride. Round up the whole family and take them outside for a game or a family walk.

No Equipment – No Problem!

No Equipment – No Problem!

Many people I talk to want to exercise, but they either don’t have time to go to a gym, don’t like working out with other people, or don’t have any workout equipment at home. Of course they could try walking or running, but that’s not for everyone, and even if it is, sometimes you need a change of pace. So how can you work out at home without any equipment?

Staying Fit During Injury

Staying Fit During Injury

Injuries, unfortunately, are fairly common in the world of exercise and sports. Muscle strains, shin splints, hairline fractures, plantar fasciitis, torn rotator cuff, tendonitis, knee problems, etc. are all common injuries that occur during or as a result of exercise or sports. Some of these injuries occur when people do too much too quickly, when their bodies aren’t ready for the load applied; some happen from plain doing too much, resulting in overuse injuries; and some injuries happen out of sheer bad luck.

Creating the Drive to Exercise

Creating the Drive to Exercise

For anyone that has ever even thought of exercising, you’ll know that it is not always easy to get a daily workout in. Where our motivation might be high the night before, when our alarm goes off in the morning, it’s tough to get out of bed! Or we might be pumped about going to the gym after work, but by the time we clock out, we’re just too tired to follow through with our plan.

Diet, Exercise, or Both?

Diet, Exercise, or Both?

Diet and exercise. While these are often paired together, which is more important? Are both necessary?

Recent studies have shown that energy restriction through diet results in similar weight loss to diet plus exercise, while exercise alone results in lesser weight loss (1, 2). For many people skimming over these results in their doctor’s office magazine, dieting might seem like the path to take. But they’re only seeing half the story.